language links, ling-anth links

Language links 8/1/2019

Once a month, I share some of what I’ve been reading.


I lived in Los Angeles for just about all of my 20s, so I enjoyed this LA pronunciation guide, especially the discussion of why some terms have multiple accepted pronunciations.
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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 7/1/2019

Once a month, I share some of what I’ve been reading.


Apologies for last month’s silence: I was mid-move. (I’m still mid-move, but more organized.)

While everyone’s talking about the Democratic candidates’ use of Spanish, Nelson Flores reminds us that there’s more to it. And then there’s the President’s mock Spanish, which fits some … let’s say familiar patterns.

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 5/1/2019

Once a month, I share some of what I’ve been reading.


Do you do linguistic (or linguistics-adjacent) research on questions of sex and gender? Run, not walk, to read Kirby Conrod’s thoughts on how to get it right.

Best practices for organizing inclusive scientific meetings, courtesy of 500 Women Scientists. Tons of links and references. (See also these disability accessibility guidelines, with even more links and references.)

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 2/1/2019

Once a month, I share some of what I’ve been reading.


Fewer people are spreading fake news than we thought, and age is a big part of the puzzle. A second study found similar conclusions about age — and also that a very small set of folks are consuming and sharing fake news. (Many thoughts and questions about the two sets of methods, but I’ll save it for elsewhere.)

Megan Figueroa is crowd-sourcing a list of minoritized scholars in the field of language. Please help — and don’t be shy about including yourself!

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 1/1/2019

Once a month, I share some of what I’ve been reading.


Aren’t you curious how all those word-of-the-year lists happen? I enjoyed this peek behind the scenes. And similarly charmed by a look at the American Heritage Dictionary’s usage panel.

A truly excellent linguistic-anthropology take on #MeToo: “When ‘me too’ moves from co-oxygenated communication to digital communication, the hashtag draws on its power as the second pair-part of an atypical adjacency pair and transforms into a resource for thousands…”

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