language links, ling-anth links

Language links 11/13

Every Monday, I share some of what I’ve been reading in the past week. (Today I’m sharing my reading from the last month — I’ve been delinquent the last few weeks.)


Racially marked linguistic features are used to enact discrimination all the time — often through feigned ignorance. That’s exactly what happened to Warren Demesme, who asked for “a lawyer, dawg” and was denied on the grounds that there’s no such thing as a lawyer dog.

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 9/11: political correctness and emojis

Every Monday, I share some of what I’ve been reading in the past week.


 

“What do you mean we shouldn’t try hard to be inoffensive?”  Listen to a radio host brilliantly defending political correctness, and largely convincing the caller by the end. “So there’s this idea that on the horizon it could become illegal to say, that’s for girls and that’s for boys. To indulge that slightly unlikely fantasy for just a moment, what’s the worst that could happen if that did occur?”

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 8/28: pop culture and female scientists

Every Monday, I share some of what I’ve been reading in the past week.


Pop culture can do a lot of the heavy lifting around changing people’s minds. The Ford Foundation and AndACTION write, “Rather than using a flat narrative or one-dimensional characters to appeal to the viewer, successful shows are built around complex characters with whom audiences connect over time, an example of identification theory used for entertainment education. Compare a classic after-school special with an obvious agenda to a show like ‘The Good Wife’ that addresses issues of discrimination and religious freedom authentically, and it is clear why current pop culture is more effective at generating empathy.”

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