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Some new(ish) writing

I’ve been rather delinquent in updating here, but I do have a bunch of work that I’m excited to share. (If you don’t have access to something, just let me know – I’m always happy to help out!)

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Meaningful Math

The limits of official statistics” is out in Public Anthropologies, which is American Anthropologist‘s peer-reviewed blog. I got to play with genre – and it’s one of my favorite pieces of my own writing.

A team of folks from Knology (where I work) and PBS NewsHour co-authored “Better news about math” for Numeracy. We lay out a research agenda for understanding the relationship between news and quantitative reasoning – and we’re biting off that research a little at a time, so keep an eye out for more.

Some work-in-progress from that project is available on the Knology website as an irregular series about Numbers in the News.

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Methodological Innovations

I’ve gotten to work with wonderful colleagues on methods papers that bring together various linguistic and discourse methods with survey research.

Josh Raclaw, Abby Bajuniemi, and I have an article in Discourse, Context, & Media arguing that online surveys are themselves interactions. We look at turn construction in open-ended items and some other fun stuff like that.

John Voiklis, Darcey Glasser, John Fraser, and I have an article in Journal of Pragmatics where we look at self-reference practices in survey responses about the relevance of a number of news pieces.

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Epistemic Stuff

The encyclopedia chapter on hedge words that Alex D’Arcy and I co-wrote in … *checks calendar* 2017 … is finally available.

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 10/1/2019

Once a month, I share some of what I’ve been reading.


After a whistleblower complaint last week, the White House released a so-called ‘transcript’ of a phone call between the US and Ukrainian presidents. It’s clear for many reasons that ‘transcript’ is an inaccurate label — and my wonderful colleagues explained why #NotATranscript is important.

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 9/3/2019

Once a month, I share some of what I’ve been reading.


Happy Labor Day!

I can’t recommend this essay by Adrienne Lo highly enough: “The field of language and race is often criticized from the outside as being both ‘too American’ and also too invested in the notion of race itself, as though taking the representations of racialization as a serious matter for study is the same as supporting racialization itself.”

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 7/1/2019

Once a month, I share some of what I’ve been reading.


Apologies for last month’s silence: I was mid-move. (I’m still mid-move, but more organized.)

While everyone’s talking about the Democratic candidates’ use of Spanish, Nelson Flores reminds us that there’s more to it. And then there’s the President’s mock Spanish, which fits some … let’s say familiar patterns.

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 5/1/2019

Once a month, I share some of what I’ve been reading.


Do you do linguistic (or linguistics-adjacent) research on questions of sex and gender? Run, not walk, to read Kirby Conrod’s thoughts on how to get it right.

Best practices for organizing inclusive scientific meetings, courtesy of 500 Women Scientists. Tons of links and references. (See also these disability accessibility guidelines, with even more links and references.)

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 2/1/2019

Once a month, I share some of what I’ve been reading.


Fewer people are spreading fake news than we thought, and age is a big part of the puzzle. A second study found similar conclusions about age — and also that a very small set of folks are consuming and sharing fake news. (Many thoughts and questions about the two sets of methods, but I’ll save it for elsewhere.)

Megan Figueroa is crowd-sourcing a list of minoritized scholars in the field of language. Please help — and don’t be shy about including yourself!

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 1/1/2019

Once a month, I share some of what I’ve been reading.


Aren’t you curious how all those word-of-the-year lists happen? I enjoyed this peek behind the scenes. And similarly charmed by a look at the American Heritage Dictionary’s usage panel.

A truly excellent linguistic-anthropology take on #MeToo: “When ‘me too’ moves from co-oxygenated communication to digital communication, the hashtag draws on its power as the second pair-part of an atypical adjacency pair and transforms into a resource for thousands…”

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