language links, ling-anth links

Language links 12/11

Every Monday, I share some of what I’ve been reading in the past week.


Words are gendered: “The main finding was that women saw jobs as less appealing, and were less likely to think they belonged, when an ad relied heavily on masculine-coded vocabulary. (Men’s perceptions were less affected by the choice of words: they did find ‘feminine’ ads less appealing than ‘masculine’ ones, but the effect was very slight.) The researchers concluded that the wording of job ads is a factor affecting women’s willingness to apply. The issue isn’t just that women see themselves as unsuited to particular kinds of work: even when they have the right qualifications, the perception that they won’t fit in cropped-c47620c5e92a01104c2e9b60258cc3fb.gifis reinforced by ads that use masculine-coded language.”
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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 11/13

Every Monday, I share some of what I’ve been reading in the past week. (Today I’m sharing my reading from the last month — I’ve been delinquent the last few weeks.)


Racially marked linguistic features are used to enact discrimination all the time — often through feigned ignorance. That’s exactly what happened to Warren Demesme, who asked for “a lawyer, dawg” and was denied on the grounds that there’s no such thing as a lawyer dog.

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