language links, ling-anth links

Language links 2/26

Every Monday, I share some of what I’ve been reading in the past week.


Have you seen Black Panther yet? Run, don’t walk.Then read this article about isiXhosa and how it’s used in the movie. And then, after that, I recommend this interview with the dialect coach who trained the cast to speak with a Wakandan accent. (She’s white, and she talks a bit about that in a forthright way. She also knows a thing or two about linguistics, which is unfortunately uncommon among dialect coaches.)

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 2/5

Every Monday, I share some of what I’ve been reading in the past week.


There’s lots of discrimination based on accents, and something of a hierarchy in how we tend to rank them.The Accentism Project documents many such experiences of discrimination, and compiles research on the topic. Related: there’s also some research showing that other factors (e.g. perceptions of race, other positive orn egative judgments) mean that some people are more likely to be perceived as speaking with an accent regardless of how they actually speak.

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 1/22

Every Monday, I share some of what I’ve been reading in the past week.


Linguistics and consent mini-roundup:

  • Sarah Shulist: “It means we have a ton of skills around [understanding ways of saying no], the evidence from linguistic research demonstrates our ability to navigate these acts, and we need to think about claims not to recognize refusals in sexual encounters as deliberate acts that go against all social training, rather than as accidents and natural misinterpretations.”
  • A summary of a few formative articles on the topic.
  • The venerable Kitzinger & Frith (1999) article that did a fantastic linguistic analysis of ways of saying no.

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language links, ling-anth links

Language links 1/15

Every Monday, I share some of what I’ve been reading in the past week.


Once more, for the kids in the back: “The effects of sexist language are not negligible. Language enables us to order and categorise the world. If our language is biased, our ordering and categories will be inaccurate.” (And did you know: historically, Mrs. had nothing to do with marital status and was chiefly a professional title?

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