inclusive language, linguistic anthropology

Let’s stop demonizing “filler words”

A few days ago, the New York Times published an article by Christopher Mele about so-called “filler words,”┬átelling people to stop using them. Reporting on language often frustrates me, and this was no exception. In fact, thirty-odd linguists — including me — sent them a letter detailing our many concerns with this article. In particular, the article makes two major mistakes: Continue reading

Advertisements
Standard
inclusive language, linguistic anthropology

On Partnership

The other day, I was talking to some people I don’t know well about their daughter and her boyfriend, who lived near me. “Do you have a … partner in life?” one of them asked.

The following conversation made it clear that this wording was an intentional effort at inclusivity. Continue reading

Standard