Everyday linguistic anthropology

Language links 9/11: political correctness and emojis

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Every Monday, I share some of what I’ve been reading in the past week.


 

“What do you mean we shouldn’t try hard to be inoffensive?”  Listen to a radio host brilliantly defending political correctness, and largely convincing the caller by the end. “So there’s this idea that on the horizon it could become illegal to say, that’s for girls and that’s for boys. To indulge that slightly unlikely fantasy for just a moment, what’s the worst that could happen if that did occur?”

A quick, social-scienced-backed, four-question guide to organizational communications.

Monolingualism is career-limiting — what if Anglophone nations took three steps:
1. made the most of existing multilingualism (indigenous and heritage and immigrant languages),
2. developed a better language curriculum, and
3. had real professional development for multilingual teachers?
One professor concludes, “[Children] will grow up in a more inclusive, prosperous and internationally engaged nation – and can grasp opportunities denied to previous, monolingual generations.”

Do women use too many emojis? Or should we stop wasting our time policing women’s language?

The ironies of translation: a (misguided) attempt to translate dog-whistle “Blue Lives Matter” into Irish.

 

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